Howard Stern: ‘Bring back DDT!’

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Howard Stern, radio personality and host of The Howard Stern Show, one of the most popular and influential radio programs in America, is calling for the insecticide DDT to be brought back to battle the bedbugs in New York and the malarial mosquitos in Africa. “It’s time for this nonsense to stop,” Stern declared. He praised an article by CFACT senior policy advisor Paul Driessen and quoted from it extensively to support his case.

Driessen recently wrote about the drastically different consequences the ban on DDT is having in America and Africa. “Growing infestations of the ravenous bloodsuckers have New Yorkers annoyed, anguished, angry about officialdom’s inadequate responses,” says Driessen. In the past, DDT was used effectively to deal with bedbug infestations.

Howard Stern agreed with Driessen that Africa’s malaria problem dwarfs the bedbug issue, saying, “You’re talking about the difference between life and death. They gotta have some insecticides.” Stern continued, “forget about a bunch of city-dwellers with their emotional distress with bedbugs. You’re talking about malaria!”

South Africa, one of the few African nations wealthy enough to fund its own anti-malaria campaign, has used insecticides and DDT to reduce malaria disease and death rates by nearly 95% from 1999-2000 levels, Driessen reports. The rest of Africa is not so fortunate, due to many aid agencies’ refusal to fund DDT programs.

As a result of anti-DDT policies, Driessen says, malaria still “kills over a million annually, most of them children and mothers, the vast majority of them in Africa. It drains families’ meager savings, and magnifies and perpetuates the region’s endemic poverty.”

Howard Stern read extensively from Paul’s article and gave his verdict: “they gotta bring back DDT. Stop being a bunch of pussies.”

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CFACT defends the environment and human welfare through facts, news, and analysis.