New study questions decline of predatory fish

Are people gobbling up the ocean’s biggest predatory fish?  Well that concept has been popular for more than a decade, with claims that humans are eating up the ocean’s big fish, and then moving to smaller marine species further down the food chain. But according to an article on Livescience.com, new research at the University of Washington contradicts this assessment, and indicates that on a global scale, predatory fish are not being replaced in nets by prey fish.  Indeed, catches of many large fish, like bigeye tuna, have increased along with those of smaller species – from Japanese anchovy down to filter-feeding American oysters.  The debate will surely continue, but this is certainly a boat-full of encouraging news.

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CFACT defends the environment and human welfare through facts, news, and analysis.