The Summer of Science

Where Would You Like To Go

Unlike other summers, this year is rightfully filled with daily news. The EU, Syria, just to mention a few and disregarding the Olympics. No tabloids with reported aliens or slight nudity in the city.

For fans of science, and science fiction, however, we get our fair share.

According to a most ambitious take on Time Travel, this prospect also reveals sociological, and in a way political, patterns.

No, stop it right right there. Regardless of that particle under the Swiss/French alps, No, it’s not possible. The interesting thing is that conservatives/classical liberals tend to be more inclined to travel to the future, than to the past. The same group of people who normally question Malthus (refuted long ago by reality), and Rachel Carson (same thing).

Consequently, the same people who would consider going back in time, are those who by draconian environmental regulations, strive to recreate ancient living conditions.

It might be called rational optimism. The world is not going blast within a foreseeable future, and the politicians should stop infringing liberty and spending our money on futile projects to battle another SF-idea; Man Made Global Warming. Not that I’m all unhappy here, but, hey, with the right company, a trip into a future where the UNFCCC has not destroyed it all could be fun.

I can be the tour leader. And then we are, apparently, off to Mars. That’s just a robot running around, but people are going crazy over it. I admit to some enthusiasm myself, though I presume that the only chance for human colonisation lies way beyond this solar system. And its costly, I know, but it’s fun. A reason as god as any to let private companies take care of future explorations.

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About the Author: Einar Du Rietz

Einar Du Rietz is a journalist and communications consultant based in Europe. He has authored several environmental reports for the Electrolux Group and written many blogs for the Center for the New Europe at CNE Environment.