Meeting a flood with Cajun grace

The flooding in Louisiana is rife with tragedy.  Graham Beduze selfie

People saw their homes and possessions washed away.

Some lost their lives.

Yet amidst the hardship and suffering something extraordinary happened.  As the waters rose up, so did the people.

A “Cajun Navy” formed as people took to their personal boats and ferried their neighbors to safety.  A “Cajun Marine Corps.” followed as local people joined their professional responders to lend a helping hand.

Graham Beduze is a Louisiana native and member of CFACT’s crack student organizing staff.  I was with him at our recent “Eco-Summit” in Minnesota.

“I’ve gotta get there,” Graham told me.  So we dispatched him home with water and supplies and CFACT’s own Cajun responder got to work.

Take a look at these pictures Graham shot as he joined thousands of others to wade through the devastation asking people, “Do you need to get somewhere safe? Do you have something to eat and drink?  Do you have clothing?  A blanket?  What do you need?  How can I help?”

“I just started driving around town, particularly to the areas I knew had been hit the hardest,” Graham said. “I partnered with some people who were just doing the same thing I was-helping whoever needed help without ever having met them before. It was really emotional, seeing how many folks came out to help the community. It’s a terrible disaster…but we’ll always be here for our fellow Louisianans.”  You can follow Graham’s efforts at CFACT Campus.

When natural disaster strikes it is up to those who can to lend a helping hand.

Sadly, some just don’t get it.

Some legislators thought the situation called for more bureaucracy and requiring Cajun navy and marines to obtain certificates and pay a fee before permitting them to help would be just the ticket.

They don’t get it.  We’re glad Graham and his neighbors do.

Many observed that when Hurricane Katrina struck, politicians and the media tried to use images of the tragedy to question the competence of President George W. Bush, yet gave President Obama a pass when Louisianans suffered once again.  We know the playing field’s not level.  That’s why we work to level it.

Al Gore and the climate crowd couldn’t wait to exploit the situation by blaming it on global warming.  They know no shame and think we are blind to the facts.  Professor Roger Pielke, Jr. dispelled that nonsense by rolling out the data.

Sorry climate propagandists, floods are not increasing.  Check out the facts at Climate Depot.

Some seek to exploit tragedy.  Others seek to help.

We’re proud of Graham Beduze and the Cajun navy and marines.

Gore and company… not so much.

Louisiana flag


About the Author: Craig Rucker

Craig Rucker is the executive director and co-founder of CFACT.

  1. Li D

    Oh Dr Pielke jr. Thats a seriousl bit
    of self deluding chart ya put up in
    that Depot link.
    The base subject matter is flooding from
    more extreme downpours, not economic effects.
    There could be a variety of reasons why economic effects are decreasing,
    not the least being improved flood defenses and preparedness.
    Its a really pisspoor sorta proxy for
    the matter at hand.
    Why not post a chart about wether heavy downpours are decreasing or
    increasing in USA or more better, the
    Which would get closer to the nub of the matter.
    Anyone wish to look that up and post it here?

    Theres all sorts of pitfalls one
    could make about flooding increase or decrease irrespective of weather
    including landuse changes affecting
    runoff rates and silting up of river beds.
    If its established heavy downpours are decreasing or increasing, the next
    step is to find out why.
    A worthy cause for government funding methinks.

  2. Dano2
  3. Immortal600

    We have TWO AGW kooks commenting on this article. A real pair of clowns. One that needs psychiatric help, the other? Who knows what that fool needs. A brain perhaps?

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