Energy

FAQ

Our Energy & Environment Truth File Q&A contains answers to a broad range of questions about energy issues.

 

CFACT Reports

Justice through Affordable Energy for Wisconsin

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen’s Justice through Affordable Energy for Wisconsin analyzse why affordable energy is crucial to promoting justice and advancing civil rights, using Wisconsin as a case study. Driessen argues:

“Energy is the Master Resource – the foundation for everything we eat, make, ship and do. With abundant, reliable, affordable energy, almost anything is possible, and we can improve, enrich and safeguard countless lives. Without it, jobs, living standards, basic rights and modern civilization are imperiled.”

Driessen also notes that laws and policies that restrict access to America’s abundant energy resources “block the door to opportunity, creating unnecessary and unacceptable obstacles to the natural, justifiable desire of poor and minority Americans to share in the American Dream. They tarnish the golden years of senior citizens, forcing too many to choose between heating and eating.”

He also examines the oft-ignored risks of climate change policies, reveals the devastating economic effects of a cap-tax-and-trade system, and exposes popular renewable energy myths.

A Scientific Critique of the EPA’s Mercury Rule

Willie Soon, PhD, wrote “A Scientific Critique of the Environmental Protection Agency’s ‘National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] from Coal- and Oil-fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units’ Proposed Rule (March 16, 2011) – Focusing on the Mercury Emission Issues.”

This detailed 85-page report explains how the EPA failed to describe the scientific reality of natural processes and multi-factorial controls that govern the cycling of mercury (Hg) and the ultimate biomethylation and bioaccumulation processes for methylmercury (MeHg). Soon concludes that “EPA’s proposed NESHAP provides no detectable beneficial outcomes in the control of mercury emissions (even accepting EPA’s own risk-benefit analysis without a challenge). The new rules will result in a major economic impact, harm American public health by creating exaggerated and unfounded fears about eating fish that are beneficial in everyone’s diet, and further degrade the essential role of science in informing public policy.”

 

Recent Articles

Energy
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    Six energy policy changes to watch for in a Republican-controlled Congress

    CFACT advisor Marita Noon suggests six major areas of confrontation and change now the the Republican Party controls both the House and Senate: the long-awaited (and perhaps too late) approval for the Keystone XL pipeline; a major expansion of oil and gas and minerals development on federal lands; lifting the current ban on U.S. oil and gas exports; reining in the EPA’s power, especially as it applies to the proposed Clean Power Plan and the expanded Waters of the United States regulations; major reforms to the Endangered Species Act that would turn landowners from enemies to protectors of threatened and endangered species; and an end to climate alarmism as official U.S. Congress policy. Nearly all of these changes are expected to be vigorously fought by President Obama and the White House.

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    The oil price election connection

    According to CFACT advisor Marita Noon, while the U.S. oil shale boom (the result of fracking) has dramatically increased domestic oil and gas production, the Middle East is still playing a significant role both in the current drop in oil prices and down the road. ISIS is selling oil at below-market prices to willing rogue customers, and Saudi Arabia has increased its own production, even as the price of oil falls below the amount needed to sustain the Saudi economy. The Saudis are hoping to push both American and Canadian oil prices down below the cost of extraction from both shale and tar sands in hopes of slowing down or even stopping expansion of North American exploration and production.

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    EU climate compromise: I will if you will

    Marita Noon says that the European Union may appear to have reached a consensus agreement on carbon dioxide reductions, renewables use, and energy efficiency — but the agreement includes a proviso that it only takes effect if all of the major carbon dioxide emitter countries become signatories to the non-treaty agreement that President Obama thinks he can make effective even without Senate confirmation.

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    Fracking in Texas: What do students think?

    Given that Texas leads the nation in oil and gas production, and that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has been the driver in this jobs renaissance, one might think that Texas college students, especially at the state’s flagship university, would be well informed on oil and gas production and on fracking in particular. The truth is that, despite the fact that cheap energy is vital for economic growth and expensive energy hurts the poor and those on fixed incomes the most, about half of the students interviewed had no opinion or just did not know what fracking is. This creates an opportunity for education — and if Texas students are so uninformed, one might assume that students in other states might also benefit from a sound public education campaign like Real Energy Not Green Energy.

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    Environment benefits from free enterprise prosperity

    The biggest problem isn’t that the Earth has too many rich people, or too many people altogether. Rather, is that there are so many poor tragic victims of largely UN-orchestrated, climate-crisis premised, anti-carbon energy starvation policies.

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    The Truth Files

    The facts on climate, energy, environment. Read the truth files.

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    2007: a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate

    Back in 2007, states passed renewable portfolio standards at the same time the George W. Bush Administration was patting itself on the back for enacting the renewable fuels standard — aka the ethanol mandate. Seven years later, most people see the flaws in this energy strategy, but the EPA continues unabated in its quest to push more ethanol into America’s automobiles.

Coal
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    Six energy policy changes to watch for in a Republican-controlled Congress

    CFACT advisor Marita Noon suggests six major areas of confrontation and change now the the Republican Party controls both the House and Senate: the long-awaited (and perhaps too late) approval for the Keystone XL pipeline; a major expansion of oil and gas and minerals development on federal lands; lifting the current ban on U.S. oil and gas exports; reining in the EPA’s power, especially as it applies to the proposed Clean Power Plan and the expanded Waters of the United States regulations; major reforms to the Endangered Species Act that would turn landowners from enemies to protectors of threatened and endangered species; and an end to climate alarmism as official U.S. Congress policy. Nearly all of these changes are expected to be vigorously fought by President Obama and the White House.

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    Being anti-energy is being anti-humanity

    So the UN IPCC wants us to stop using fossil fuels entirely by 2100 — whether or not we will need them. Alan Caruba recommends that everyone read Alex Epstein’s great new book, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels. Epstein argues that we have used the power of fossil-fueled machines to build a durable civilization that is highly resilient to extreme heat, extreme cold, floods, storms, and so on” — and that this demonstrates the foolishness of those who oppose their use.

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    Congress’ job: “Reins” in the runaway EPA

    Now that he no longer has to face the public, President Obama may soon unleash a torrent of radical executive orders with far-reaching consequences, but his regulatory bodies are advancing an all-out war on the U.S. oil and gas industry that can only be curtailed through Congressional action (at least for now). The chief problem is that the EPA’s regulations constitute “s power without accountability — a useful formula politically but an abysmal one for policy-making.” The REINS Act would end this shell game.”

  • http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/cornucopia1-213x120.jpg

    Environment benefits from free enterprise prosperity

    The biggest problem isn’t that the Earth has too many rich people, or too many people altogether. Rather, is that there are so many poor tragic victims of largely UN-orchestrated, climate-crisis premised, anti-carbon energy starvation policies.

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    Don’t give up America’s economic and competitive advantage

    In the midst of beheadings, Russia’s troop buildup inside Ukraine, and Ebola cases skyrocketing, Hillary Clinton made the claim that climate change “is the most consequential, urgent, sweeping collection of challenges we face as a nation and a world.” How bizarre! Even in Germany, where subsidies have built a gigantic solar industry, solar produced only 0.1% of the nation’s energy in the month of January. America, notes Marita Noon, has abundant coal, oil and natural gas resources that we ought not squander.

Hydraulic Fracturing
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    Time to repeal America’s crude petroleum export ban

    Paul Driessen lays out the case for ending the ban on overseas shipment of crude petroleum, and in the process notes how shipping crude and refined petroleum overseas would be a boon to the U.S. economy and might also prod European nations to rethink their own policies towards energy production.

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    Defusing the explosive conversation on fracking

    The myths about hydraulic fracturing (fracking) are myriad and cynical — spread by haters of fossil fuels and by those who want to see the United States crippled as a result of shutting down the bulk of the traditional energy sector in favor of heavily subsidized “renewables” and forcing a massive shrinkage of living standards for most Americans (but not the elites). The truth is that fracking has evolved into a virtually benign operation that relies heavily on brackish water that is processed and often reused.

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    U.S. fast inflating supply of natural gas

    For decades, policymakers have been concerned about America’s over-reliance on fossil fuel imports from other parts of the world. But thanks to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, many of these concerns are now being alleviated.

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    Drillers gassed up over large U.S. shale reserves

    Finding affordable and abundant sources of domestic energy has become a big priority in recent years. And while many options are being looked at, one that has taken the nation by storm is the development of shale gas.

Natural Gas
  • http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Senate-213x120.jpg

    Six energy policy changes to watch for in a Republican-controlled Congress

    CFACT advisor Marita Noon suggests six major areas of confrontation and change now the the Republican Party controls both the House and Senate: the long-awaited (and perhaps too late) approval for the Keystone XL pipeline; a major expansion of oil and gas and minerals development on federal lands; lifting the current ban on U.S. oil and gas exports; reining in the EPA’s power, especially as it applies to the proposed Clean Power Plan and the expanded Waters of the United States regulations; major reforms to the Endangered Species Act that would turn landowners from enemies to protectors of threatened and endangered species; and an end to climate alarmism as official U.S. Congress policy. Nearly all of these changes are expected to be vigorously fought by President Obama and the White House.

  • http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/CityLights-213x120.jpg

    Being anti-energy is being anti-humanity

    So the UN IPCC wants us to stop using fossil fuels entirely by 2100 — whether or not we will need them. Alan Caruba recommends that everyone read Alex Epstein’s great new book, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels. Epstein argues that we have used the power of fossil-fueled machines to build a durable civilization that is highly resilient to extreme heat, extreme cold, floods, storms, and so on” — and that this demonstrates the foolishness of those who oppose their use.

  • http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/skyrocketing-213x120.jpg

    Congress’ job: “Reins” in the runaway EPA

    Now that he no longer has to face the public, President Obama may soon unleash a torrent of radical executive orders with far-reaching consequences, but his regulatory bodies are advancing an all-out war on the U.S. oil and gas industry that can only be curtailed through Congressional action (at least for now). The chief problem is that the EPA’s regulations constitute “s power without accountability — a useful formula politically but an abysmal one for policy-making.” The REINS Act would end this shell game.”

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    From the battlefield to the oilfield, it is all about employing veterans

    A quarter million veterans a year reenter civilian life, and many are looking for jobs in perhaps the worst labor market since the Great Depression. The oil and gas industry, which has been growing rapidly with the advent of fracking, provides an opportunity for these veterans to find meaningful work.

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    The oil price election connection

    According to CFACT advisor Marita Noon, while the U.S. oil shale boom (the result of fracking) has dramatically increased domestic oil and gas production, the Middle East is still playing a significant role both in the current drop in oil prices and down the road. ISIS is selling oil at below-market prices to willing rogue customers, and Saudi Arabia has increased its own production, even as the price of oil falls below the amount needed to sustain the Saudi economy. The Saudis are hoping to push both American and Canadian oil prices down below the cost of extraction from both shale and tar sands in hopes of slowing down or even stopping expansion of North American exploration and production.

  • http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/cornucopia1-213x120.jpg

    Environment benefits from free enterprise prosperity

    The biggest problem isn’t that the Earth has too many rich people, or too many people altogether. Rather, is that there are so many poor tragic victims of largely UN-orchestrated, climate-crisis premised, anti-carbon energy starvation policies.

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    Colorado Dems frack backtrack is all about November

    CFACT Advisor Marita Noon points to a primary election in New Mexico as the impetus for Colorado Democrats to back away from legislation to curtail hydraulic fracturing (fracking), a measure that would hurt Colorado’s economy and quite likely the chances for Democrats there to win elections this fall. Cynical? You betcha! If they should win in November, will these measures be back on the table?

Nuclear Power
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    True facts about ocean radiation and the Fukushima disaster

    The Fukushima disaster has “led to some wild speculation on the widespread dangers of Fukushima radiation on the internet… I’m here to tell you that these posts are just plain garbage. While there are terrible things that happened around the Fukushima Power Plant in Japan; Alaska, Hawaii and the West Coast aren’t in any danger. These posts were meant to scare people (and possibly written by terrified authors). They did just that, but there is a severe lack of facts in these posts. Which is why I am here to give you the facts, and nothing but the facts.”

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    Physicist: There was no Fukushima nuclear disaster

    Anti-nuclear activists do not want the public to know the truth. Fukushima showed that a nuclear plant can take the maximum punch of nature’s brutality. Yet the media and the anti-nukes enjoy stoking the fear.

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    Will cooling temperatures calm the European windstorm?

    After Denmark (Europe’s star wind energy performer), Germany boasts (sic!) the highest power costs in Europe — Danes and Germans alike pay about 300% more than Americans for electric power that is increasingly unreliable. The Australians, who had charted a similar course, threw out their Green government. But what will Americans do?

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    Report indicates no major health effects from Fukushima

    When the nuclear power plant at Fukushima, Japan was damaged by a major earthquake, many expected long-term radiation problems. But scientists recently brought together by a UN scientific committee found Japan’s general public and the vast majority of workers at Fukushima are unlikely to suffer any future health effects linked to small radiation leaks.

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    German media’s veer from green energy

    A few years ago, Germany was “fully committed” to the EU’s goal of ending fossil fuel use. It was building lots of wind turbines, and even some solar farms despite its often-cloudy skies. After the tsunami, Prime Minister Angela Merckel announced Germany would phase out its nuclear plants quickly, implying more power from renewables.

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    Fukushima fallout spurs safer nuclear design

    Like a phoenix rising from ashes, nuclear power has seen a renaissance in recent years after decades of bad publicity. And while the accident at Fukushima cast an ominous shadow over its future, experts are now applying some important lessons to new designs.

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    Dr. Kelvin Kemm on Kenyan TV

    Dr. Kelvin Kemm, a South African nuclear physicist and CFACT advisor, explains on Kenyan TV that Africans need to greatly increase the availability of affordable electricity and do not need Europeans telling them “No.”

Solar Power
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    2007: a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate

    Back in 2007, states passed renewable portfolio standards at the same time the George W. Bush Administration was patting itself on the back for enacting the renewable fuels standard — aka the ethanol mandate. Seven years later, most people see the flaws in this energy strategy, but the EPA continues unabated in its quest to push more ethanol into America’s automobiles.

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    Abengoa Solar combines taxpayer dollars and deceptive practices to succeed

    With key players like former Energy Secretary Bill Richardson and former Vice President Al Gore on board, no wonder Spanish-based Abengoa Solar was able to garner $2.8 billion in federal loan guarantees plus a $818 million federal grant to help it compete with other energy suppliers. But recently, the firm has been under investigation for immigration and employment fraud, using outdated technology, and making dangerous design decisions. But will California bestow a major contract on this lawless firm on May 7? Stay tuned.

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    Obama’s war on U.S. energy

    Alan Caruba argues that President Obama is waging a real war against conventional U.S. energy sources — coal, oil. and natural gas — but in ways that benefit his friends and punish his enemies. His solar initiatives have mostly been money laundering operations (at least, effectively) like Solyndra; his continued stalling on the Keystone XL pipeline benefits billionaire Warren Buffett; and his administration has issued the fewest number of onshore oil and natural gas leases and drilling permits on federal lands since the government began maintaining leasing and drilling permit records.

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    Clouds on the solar horizon: Scams, fraud are rampant

    Marita Noon reports on some of the vagaries faced by buyers of rooftop solar panels. Florida purchasers were stuck with bills of up to $40,000 for systems that may be unusable or unsafe installed by now-bankrupt companies who will not honor warranties. Elsewhere, firefighters have discussed the risks (electrocution is just one) from fighting fires in buildings with rooftop solar installations. Other solar companies mislead customers or even take their money and disappear.

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    U.S. electricity system in regulatory and terrorist crosshairs

    Nero fiddled while Rome burned, we are told. Will President Obama be playing golf when terrorists attack the U.S. power grid so as to force a massive, multi-state blackout? Or will he and colleagues like Secretary of State Kerry and EPA Administrator McCarthy remain wholly focused on their own efforts to shut down the power grid through regulations and (as they did with BenGhazi and the Fort Hood shooter) refuse even to brand such an act as terrorist?

Wind Power
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    2007: a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate

    Back in 2007, states passed renewable portfolio standards at the same time the George W. Bush Administration was patting itself on the back for enacting the renewable fuels standard — aka the ethanol mandate. Seven years later, most people see the flaws in this energy strategy, but the EPA continues unabated in its quest to push more ethanol into America’s automobiles.

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    Parasitic power: Dollars blowing in the wind

    Governments have gambled massively on wind energy claiming it emits less carbon dioxide and that this will help prevent dangerous global warming. Incredibly, this claim is not supported by cost-benefit analysis.

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    The PTC extension: More taxpayer dollars for green energy?

    Marita Noon provides a laundry list of reasons to ignore calls from fire-breathing wind power shills who want to reinstate the wind power production tax credit — and thus rip off the U.S. Treasury to build noneconomic wind farms that also cause health and safety problems and still rely on backup generation due to the intermittent nature of wind speed.

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    The 2014 state of wind energy

    Ever since the wind power Production Tax Credit expired last year, the lobbying to restore the costly, wasteful tax credit has been intense. Recently, 26 Senators and 118 House members signed a letter urgning its restoration — but whether they will succeed is an entirely different matter. As a result, even GE’s Jeffrey Immelt is talking about “a world that’s unsubsidized.”

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    Wind farms to get free pass on eagle kills

    The bald eagle, a bird which serves as our nation’s symbol, has long enjoyed special protection under the Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald Eagle Protection Act. These permits, unlike previous ones, will allow for the killing of eagles for a lengthy 30 years.