EPA rolling back Obama’s mercury rule

The Obama administration originally found that forcing coal-fired plants to use the mercury control technology would cost an estimated $9.6 billion a year — the most expensive clean air regulation. This cost was far higher than the expected annual health savings of $6 million. However, the administration was able to rack up these health saving numbers by enabling the MATS Rule, with co-benefits adding another $80 billion, according to The New York Times.

By |2018-10-01T17:02:57+00:00October 1st, 2018|Energy|0 Comments

Decline of oil predicted, but we’ve heard this before

According to a survey published last month in the United Kingdom, climate change risks will force a lower valuation of oil company stock prices within the next five years. But despite many predictions of demise over the last 50 years, global consumption of hydrocarbon energy continues to grow.

By |2018-05-09T11:49:19+00:00May 9th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Decline of oil predicted, but we’ve heard this before

Frigid cold is why we need dependable energy

While China, India, and other nations are building new coal-fired power plants, the United States, which nearly a quarter of the world's coal reserves, is still following the path laid out by President Obama of phasing out coal production. Canadian analyst Tom Harris, whose home province of Ontario has banned all coal-fired power generation, explains that this stems from the myth that carbon dioxide is as dirty as coal.

By |2018-01-17T01:16:32+00:00January 17th, 2018|Climate, Guest Insights|3 Comments

War on coal divides the European Union

The rich West wants to stop using coal while the poor East depends on it. Germany is caught in the middle. The future of the EU may turn on this issue, because East-West tensions are already great.

By |2017-12-18T22:26:13+00:00December 19th, 2017|Energy|Comments Off on War on coal divides the European Union

End the ‘war on coal’

New Zealander Bryan Leyland and Canadian Tom Harris, both of the International Climate Science Coalition, argue that the United States is setting a bad example and harming its own people -- and those in developing nations -- by continuing the EPA's war on coal, nuclear energy, and natural gas. Wind and solar have major problems with reliability, cost, and adverse health and environmental impacts that their proponents gloss over, whereas emissions from modern, highly efficient coal-fired power plants with stack gas cleanup consist almost entirely of water, CO2, and nitrogen.

By |2017-12-08T21:06:28+00:00December 8th, 2017|Guest Insights|8 Comments

Sharing our blessings

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen wishes the entire world a happy time of thanksgiving -- for the fossil fuels, hydroelectric power, and other contributions to reliable, affordable energy that has powered a dramatic shift in life expectancy and standards of living and world health, lifting billions out of poverty. He further challenges us to extend these blessings to the billions who even today lack the blessings of energy, in part because of elitist, eco-imperialist refusal to underwrite the financing of anything but renewable energy that is unreliable, expensive, and only in some cases the best (short-term) option.

By |2017-11-26T10:43:49+00:00November 26th, 2017|CFACT Insights|13 Comments

Virginia goes Don Quixote

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen, a Virginia resident, laments the direction that newly elected Governor Ralph Northam is taking the people of the state -- into restrictions on carbon dioxide that include cap-and-trade emissions buying and selling -- and other foolish schemes that will harm the poor and lower middle classes the most and do little or nothing to change the Earth's climate.

By |2017-11-18T20:55:34+00:00November 18th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

The changing world energy economy

West Virginia University professor James E. Smith and graduate student Alex Hatch report that the United States economy has begun to grow steadily despite falling oil consumption. Moreover, worldwide energy demand dropped significantly between 2013 and 2015 and the trend is continuing despite growing world populations and expanding energy availability. They note that , worldwide (not just in today's rich countries), the only thing limiting our future progress and comity is our imagination and ingenuity.

By |2017-11-02T11:21:18+00:00November 2nd, 2017|Guest Insights|7 Comments
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