Italy

  • The continuing circus over GM corn in Europe

    http://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/cornfield1.jpg

    It was not merely the fact that an Italian bureaucrat decided to import an otherwise banned GM crop from America that was so ironic. In addition to the special exemptions granted on a case-by-case basis to Czech, Spanish, Portuguese and Slovakian farmers, countries throughout Europe, including Italy, have imported GM corn from America in the past under a whole different array of special, case-by-case exemptions granted on a strictly controlled basis by bureaucrats in Brussels. What made Rabboni’s final decision so hypocritical, and frankly absurd, were the sheer quantities involved and the astronomical expense for an already overextended Italian treasury.

  • UN climate of desperation

    DAVID ROTHBARD & CRAIG RUCKER – The Washington Times

    As the United Nations wrapped up its recent climate conference in Bonn, talks organizer Christiana Figueres proclaimed that climate change is the “the most important negotiation the world has ever faced.” Faced with real problems – financial meltdowns, unemployment, war and genuine human suffering – the world no longer agrees.

    It’s a good thing human productivity doesn’t threaten the global thermostat the way the U.N. would have us believe. If it did, we’d be cooked. Countries rich and poor are backing away from commitments they made years ago during rosier economic times, before the public became aware of Climategate, renewable energy costs and genuine debate.

    The Kyoto Protocol, the only binding international agreement signed since the global warming scare began, expires after 2012. Canada, Russia and Japan have declared they will not renew; China and the United States never signed it, and the U.S. has made it plain it is not about to. And poor countries are becoming less enamored about signing on, as they realize hard economic times mean there will be little climate “mitigation” and “restitution” money coming their way from (formerly) rich countries.

    Even die-hard warmists increasingly recognize that bureaucratic solutions hatched at these conferences are rife with waste, fraud and abuse. They may enrich a few, but they are powerless to control Earth’s climate.

    In March, German investigators reported that 850 million euros disappeared when shady companies swarmed into carbon trading, emissions and energy businesses.Criminal enterprises raked in tens of millions, fended off regulators with delaying tactics and then announced bankruptcy or vanished. An Italian sting operation resulted in arrests of wind-farm developers who billed the country for subsidies but never produced a kilowatt of electricity.

    London’s liberal Guardian newspaper was aghast to learn that the World Bank’s Biocarbon Fund had arranged to pay European “entrepreneurs” $1 million to establish a system under which 60,000 Kenyans would restrict themselves to farming under rigidly controlled, inefficient, “sustainable” techniques. For that they will receive $1.4 million over 20 years.

    That’s right, the beneficent World Bank will enrich more Europeans so 60,000 Kenyans can receive $23.83 apiece for 20 years of drudgery, poverty and misery – a princely $1.19 a year.

  • EU Energy Orwellianism: Ignorance Is Strength

    CARLO STAGNARO In George Orwell’s masterpiece, 1984, one slogan of the party dominating Britain was: “Ignorance Is Strength.” It actually meant that the ignorance of the people is the strength of the government: if people do not know things, or do not have the information to make informed decisions, they are like subjects, not free citizens. Something […]

  • Maybe the Wind Fellas Blew Them

    Einar Du Rietz, reads an interesting article with a new angle on wind power and the EU

    The EU Structural Funds are enormous. Maybe they contribute to something good, but mostly – slightly admitted by everyone in the game – they are a feast for vested interests.

    One of the pet projects for the distributors is renewable energy projects, something the journalist Angus Stickler sheds some light on:

    “The most strikingcase is that the development of wind power stations on the Mediterranean island of Sicily, home of the notorious mafia clan Cosa Nostra.  A few weeks ago the Italian authorities seized the assets of the record sum of 1.5 billion euros. The police had uncovered an elaborate case of embezzlement and money laundering by an EU-funded project on renewable energy sources. A crime boss who recently defected described it as ‘easy pennies’ or ‘comfortable money’.”

  • Italian Senate Calls for Realism on Climate

    Reassessment and renegotiation

    Carlo Stagnaro of Istituto Bruno Leoni reports:

    The Italian Senate stands for climate realism. A motion passed on last Wednesday commits the Italian government to promote a sound discussion on climate policies with the European Union and the United Nations, with particular regard to the major changes that have occurred after the economic recession, the Climategate scandal, and the failure to reach a global deal in Copenhagen. In fact, the Senate asks both that the current commitments under the EU climate and energy package are re-negotiated, and that an independent investigation is started on the IPCC process.

  • Gone With the Wind: Carbon Millionaires Arrested for Fraud

    Wind Turbine from belowItalian Wind Fraud Investigation Extends to the Netherlands, UK, Ireland, and Spain.  Subsidies Questioned.

    For some carbon millionaires, lining their pockets legally through taxpayer subsidies and hand outs is not enough.  They choose to cheat even though they’re playing a game that’s already rigged.