Ask some, and they’ll tell you American business and capitalism is no friend of the environment.

But perhaps they ought to take a look at the growing number of small market enviro-entrepreneurs. These innovators are using their skills and know-how to improve both the state of the planet and our daily lives.

A case in point can be seen with Megan Glover. A mother of two children, Glover became concerned about the quality of her drinking water after news reports surfaced four years ago regarding the lead poisoning crisis in Flint, Michigan. When she wanted to test her water, Glover found no low-cost options available for families like hers and decided to do something about it.

Beginning in her parent’s garage in 2016, she helped start up a company called “120WaterAudit” for the purpose of creating affordable at-home water testing kits for anyone to buy. What began as humble beginnings has since expanded to provide water testing software and services to multiple states. Last year, in fact, the company earned a whopping $3.3 million in revenue.

As reported in the Indianapolis Star:

Entering the water market was a learning experience for Glover, whose history was in marketing and sales for technology companies, including Angie’s List. Glover said she initially thought the company would find success in this consumer market, selling directly to homeowners. But then she started hearing from water facilities who needed an efficient way to maintain compliance with lead and copper regulations.

Glover saw an opportunity. By fall 2017, the company had pivoted to create a digital platform for agencies and water systems that would help them collect data and cut down on administrative work. The system is something like a combination of Turbo Tax and Amazon, Glover says.

The company’s digital platform allows facilities and agencies to track water testing data across their system and comply with federal safety regulations, somewhat like how Turbo Tax helps people comply with federal tax requirements. And like an Amazon for water sampling, 120Water testing kits are delivered to the doors of people within that system for testing, complete with sample bottles, instructions and return shipping labels.”

Today, the company’s products are in use at 180,000 locations nationwide and reaches 14 states –including some very large community water systems. Best of all, however, is that anybody can still buy Glover’s very affordable, at-home water testing kit at the very reasonable price range of between $54 to $84.

Score one for free market environmentalism!

For more information, you can see the full article here in The Indianapolis Star.

Author

  • CFACT, founded in 1985 by Craig Rucker and the late (truly great) David Rothbard, examines the relationship between human freedom, and issues of energy, environment, climate, economics, civil rights and more.