About Kelvin Kemm

Dr Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and CEO of Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd, a project management company based in Pretoria, South Africa. He is the recipient of the prestigious Lifetime Achievers Award of the National Science and Technology Forum of South Africa. He does international consultancy work in strategic development.

Alice in Wonderland science

Climate propaganda regularly demands we accept impossible science. “There's no use trying,” Alice said. “One can’t believe impossible things.” “I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was younger, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” Especially with the Doha climate change confab in full swing, taxpayers, newspaper readers – and anyone dreaming of a better life through reliable, affordable energy – deserves more honest reporting and more science-based energy and environmental policies than they have been getting.

By |2012-12-06T01:45:19-05:00December 6th, 2012|CFACT Insights|5 Comments

Does the UN have Africa in an emissions arm lock?

The rich kids are trying to push Africa around, bullying African countries into accepting their opinions and, even worse, adopting their “solutions.” Africa should resist the moral and psychological pressure being exerted on it to agree to binding limits on carbon dioxide emissions. Any such agreement would place African countries at the mercy of rich UN nations without any benefit accruing to Africa.

By |2012-12-04T11:34:51-05:00December 1st, 2012|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

Media ignore German coal plants, tout propaganda film ‘Fuel’

It is amazing how biased the international media is when it comes to reporting on energy generation, specifically electricity. In mid-August, Germany opened a new 2200MW coal-fired power station near Cologne, and virtually not a word has been said about it. This dearth of reporting is even more surprising when one considers that Germany has said building new coal plants is necessary because electricity produced by wind and solar has turned out to be unaffordably expensive and unreliable. In a deteriorating economic situation, Germany's new environment minister, Peter Altmaier, who is as politically close to Chancellor Angela Merkel as it gets, [...]

By |2012-09-17T11:13:29-04:00August 28th, 2012|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

After Rio – what next?

The Rio+20 World Environmental Conference has come and gone. The “Plus 20” comes from the fact that it took place twenty years after the first such conference, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. Between these dates, I was a delegate at the 2002 world environment conference in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ever since 1992 I have watched the eco-evolution taking place.

By |2012-12-19T10:33:54-05:00June 29th, 2012|CFACT Insights, CFACT TV|Comments Off on After Rio – what next?

Rio wrapup: People matter (but not to the UN?)

The Rio+20 World Environmental Conference has come and gone. The “Plus 20” comes from the fact that it took place twenty years after the first such conference, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. Between these dates, I was a delegate at the 2002 world environment conference in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ever since 1992 I have watched the eco-evolution taking place. There is a good side and a bad side. The good side is that general world environmental awareness has been enhanced. That is definitely good. But there is still so much to be done, especially in poor countries where [...]

By |2012-09-16T22:32:15-04:00June 29th, 2012|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Rio wrapup: People matter (but not to the UN?)

Commonsense wisdom from African farmers

If you want to learn what farmers think (and need), talk to African farmers – not to bureaucrats, environmental activists or politicos at the Rio+20 United Nations summit in Rio de Janeiro. You’ll get very different, far more honest and thoughtful perspectives.

By |2012-11-13T16:03:13-05:00June 13th, 2012|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Commonsense wisdom from African farmers
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