Cars and consumer choice

By |2018-08-09T14:53:43+00:00August 9th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Cars and consumer choice

Freezing federally mandated fuel efficiency standards at 37 mpg is smart.

The Obama Administration’s 54.5 mpg standard was completely unrealistic.  It could only be met by forcing people into electric cars or tiny “econoboxes,” neither of which most consumers would voluntarily choose.

CFACT senior policy advisor Paul Driessen points out at CFACT.org that 54.5 mpgs accomplishes nothing meaningful for the climate, even if climate computer simulations are accurate, which they have never been.

The EPA and DOT estimate that the difference between the Trump 37 mpg standard and Obama 54.5 mpg rule would be a completely undetectable 0.0003 degrees Celsius (0.0005 F) by 2100. That’s a microscopic 0.00004 degrees per year!

Consumer choice is important.  It’s what makes markets efficient.  Some prefer a short range, government-subsidized electric car.  That’s their choice.  Others prefer the ability to continue their journey without pausing every 175 miles (or so) for a four to eight hour recharge.  For some people light and small cars work, but try stuffing your government-mandated child seat into an eight and three quarter foot “Smart Car” and see how much room you have left for the rest of the family.

There are many factors people employ when choosing a vehicle.  Fuel efficiency is important.  So are safety, range, passenger capacity, cargo capacity, weather handling, towing, style, comfort and the rest.

When government rules out the vehicles that suit people most, government has gone too far.