Guest Insights

  • Overheated claims on temperature records

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    By Dr. Tim Ball and Tom Harris Now that the excitement has died down over the news that Earth’s surface temperature made 2017 one of the hottest years on record, it is time for sober second thoughts. Did the January 18 announcement by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that 2017 was our planet’s […]

  • Frigid cold is why we need dependable energy

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    While China, India, and other nations are building new coal-fired power plants, the United States, which nearly a quarter of the world’s coal reserves, is still following the path laid out by President Obama of phasing out coal production. Canadian analyst Tom Harris, whose home province of Ontario has banned all coal-fired power generation, explains that this stems from the myth that carbon dioxide is as dirty as coal.

  • Time to get them off our gravy train

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    Greg Walcher, President of the Natural Resources Group, lauds the recent decision by EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to end two decades of the scurrilous “sue-and-settle” scam run by EPA for the benefit of environmentalist plaintiffs and the policies some EPA officials wanted but could not get regulatory authority to accomplish.

  • Global warming: Fake news from the start

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    Canadians Dr. Tim Ball and Tom Harris of the International Climate Science Coalition trace the history of the “global warming” scam, which is founded on equating carbon dioxide with carbon to give the public an image of carbon dioxide as “dirty.” They cite both Canadian and American politicians and scientists who have advanced this false narrative.

  • End the ‘war on coal’

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    New Zealander Bryan Leyland and Canadian Tom Harris, both of the International Climate Science Coalition, argue that the United States is setting a bad example and harming its own people — and those in developing nations — by continuing the EPA’s war on coal, nuclear energy, and natural gas. Wind and solar have major problems with reliability, cost, and adverse health and environmental impacts that their proponents gloss over, whereas emissions from modern, highly efficient coal-fired power plants with stack gas cleanup consist almost entirely of water, CO2, and nitrogen.

  • Avalanches of global warming alarmism

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    Canadians Dr. Tim Ball and Tom Harris report from Bonn that the IPCC is now resorting to even more spurious “science” than ever in support of its wildly alarmist claims of climate catastrophe around the corner. They cite a vast lack of real-world data to support these claims, noting that there are no weather stations representing about 85% of the Earth’s surface area.

  • The changing world energy economy

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    West Virginia University professor James E. Smith and graduate student Alex Hatch report that the United States economy has begun to grow steadily despite falling oil consumption. Moreover, worldwide energy demand dropped significantly between 2013 and 2015 and the trend is continuing despite growing world populations and expanding energy availability. They note that , worldwide (not just in today’s rich countries), the only thing limiting our future progress and comity is our imagination and ingenuity.

  • Trying to perpetuate alarmist climate “science”

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    Analyst David Wojick reports that the Climate Science Special Report, soon to be released by the federal Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) as Volume I of the National Climate Assessment, is an alarmist document that would undermine all efforts to rein in the climate monarchy. Wojick calls for a Red Team review of the CSSR that would be entered as an official critique of the CSSR.

  • EPA endangerment finding endangers USA

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    The U.S. Supreme Court fell for junk science when it approved the EPA’s “finding” that carbon dioxide is the chief driver of global climate change, notes CFACT advisor Dennis T. Avery. The EPA models have all been proven false using historical and current data, and thus there is no scientific underpinning for this jobs-killing, energy-crushing decision. The hope is that, with Justice Neil Gorsuch now on the bench, the Court will overturn its own “Endangerment” finding.

  • What natural disasters should teach us

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    Ugandan author Steven Lyazi scoffs at the chiding and covert racism of wealthy environmental advocates who live in luxury but demand a lower quality lifestyle for Africans. He points the finger at the Club of Rome for banning DDT once they realized that Africans not dying from malaria and other diseases would live longer and have more children. His words echo the toothless declarations that sustainable development restrictions should not apply to the very poor.

  • Enemies of humanity

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    Ugandan activist (and student) Steven Lyazi writes passionately that the West is both hypocritical and imperialistic in dictating policies to Africans that were good enough for Western nations half a century ago and could save millions of African lives — and generate up to $100 billion a year to the Afrcican economiy just from allowing the use of DDT to fight malaria. DDT use reduces death from malaria by 80% or more — and Lyazi himself is a two-time malaria survivor who notes that most Africans lack the money to pay for the costly, time-consuming treatment for this killer disease that the West eradicated 70 years ago using DDT.

  • Debunking the EPA’s fake accounts of the Gold King mine disaster

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    The EPA inspector general’s report is full of lies and misrepresentations, says Heritage Foundation senior research fellow Rob Gordon. The whitewashed report claims that the dam failure came after EPA contractors “inadvertently … initiated an internal erosion failure.” But Gordon notes the IG report omits the critical fact that the EPA crew reburied the natural plug; ignores the EPA’s wrongful assumption that the floor of the mine was 6 feet lower tghan the ground outside when in fact the adit’s entire purpose was to drain the mine; and that the EPA failed to follow its own instructions that did not include excavating the blockage.

  • Nearly doomed by too little CO2

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    Aside from protests by Al Gore, Leonardo Di Caprio, and friends, the public didn’t seem to raise its carbon dioxide (CO2) anguish much above the Russians-election frenzy when Trump exited the Paris Climate Accords. Statistician Bjorn Lomborg had already pointed out that the Paris CO2 emission promises would cost one hundred trillion dollars ($100 trillion) […]

  • U.S. funding dubious science and unfounded fear

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    Well-known researcher Ron Arnold reports on the cosy relationship between the Italian research group Ramazzini Institute and various federal agencies during the Obama Administration to classify glyphosate and other chemicals as carcinogenic while hiding research results that exonerated the chemical from such claims. The EPA’s own scientists have disputed Ramazzini research on methanol — and now we have learned that the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s chief research deliberately withheld findings from studies of 89,000 U.S. farm workers and family members that showed no link between cancer and exposure to glyphosate.

  • EPA’s suspect science

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    By John Rafuse   President Trump’s budget guidance sought to cut $1.6 billion from the Environmental Protection Agency’s $8.1 billion expectation. Shrieks of looming Armageddon prompted Congress to fund the EPA in full until September 2017, when the battle will be joined again. Then EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said he would prioritize Superfund cleanups based […]

  • Science, engineering, and leadership

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    West Virginia University professor James E. Smith argues that, without a basic understanding of the scientific process that has been so successful and useful in getting us to this point in our collective histories, we can hardly expect to see a better future if similar men and women are not at the helm. Maybe a little less pandering and a lot more proper decision-making based on scientific facts will make the governance process more attractive to professionals for whom a future legacy of successful advancements is a valued outcome – and thus better for our future.

  • Solar ovens and sustained poverty for Africa

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    Ugandan activist Steven Lyazi argues that, while wind and solar and biomass energy do provide some relief for many Africans, they are not true substitutes for round-the-clock reliable energy such as is found in First World countries with electric power grids fueled by coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear energy — all of which are in abundant supply in various African nations. Westerners tend to think it is just fine for Africans to live in poverty, especially energy poverty, while they enjoy the benefits of a fossil- and nuclear-fuel economy.

  • Financial security versus independence

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    Entrepreneurship has been the backbone of the United States economy since its inception. The good news is that Americans are still entrepreneurial and willing to take risks in search of greater rewards both financially and personally. But the U.S. must ensure that its laws and regulations do not stifle innovation and entrepreneurship.