Water is becoming more and more valuable around the world as populations increase and governments mismanage water sources.

One of the most glaring examples of this mismanagement is how the state of California flushes water into the ocean in the name of trying to help species like the Delta Smelt fish, while farmers and ranchers struggle to find enough water to produce crops and food. While everyone wants to see species saved, the water strategy pursued by the government hasn’t brought the fish populations back to healthy numbers.

One company, however, is focusing on ways to innovate and save water at the source of its use and has developed a recycling system that can be installed in homes and businesses.

Called “Hydraloop,” the system is a decentralized, installable purification system that takes some of the wastewater from activities like showers, clothes washing and more and enables one to reuse the water for other purposes.

According to the Hydraloop website:

In house water recycling is the most efficient and affordable way to use less tap water. Hydraloop collects, treats and re-uses the water from showers, baths, washers and dryers, heat pumps and air conditioning units. Depending on the configuration and user behavior up to 45% of total in house water consumption can be saved. Hydraloop water is clean, clear, safe, and disinfected. It can be re-used for toilet flushing, laundry, garden irrigation and topping up swimming pools.”

Hydraloop’s systems even just won an award from the United Nations, as reported by Bio Market Insights.

This product has great potential to improve water quality, affordability, and access, provided the UN and other governments don’t get any ideas to start mandating such technologies on structures, that is.

More information about Hydraloop can be found on the website here.

Author

  • Adam Houser coordinates student leaders as National Director of CFACT's collegians program and writes on issues of climate and energy.