Cairo, Egypt

The Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow team arrived in Egypt on the eve of the annual United Nations 27th climate change conference (“COP27”), a mass gabfest to be held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. The city is located at the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula on the Asian side of the country, on the northern coast of the Red Sea.

After 26 such conferences, the polar ice caps remain, polar bears continue to proliferate, and the oceans haven’t flooded Martha’s Vineyard or Miami. There was a big storm that hit Florida this year, which is not unusual from the recorded history and patterns of hurricane activity.

During the 30-plus years of climate doomsday predictions since before Al Gore’s 1992 flat-earth book, Earth in the Balance, doomsday has not yet arrived. Should not the UN declare victory over climate? We’ve been spared catastrophe!

Not a chance.

The global climate change industry gathers because there is so much to discuss about the future, both near and distant. That means lots of money to be made and so much power to wield over societies. It’s a great gig for attendees who comprise government bureaucrats, non-governmental organizations, multi-national corporations, university faculty and other hangers-on. The climate change industry thrives because it perpetuates itself since it always can move the goalposts of climate calamity to the 2030s and beyond, after climate predictions invariably fall flat.

Meanwhile, on their way to the climate conference, CFACT president, Craig Rucker, and Communications Director, Marc Morano of Climate Depot, stopped in Cairo to pay their respects to the Egyptian kings of the centuries B.C., housed in mummified preservation in the lower level of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization.

Among the Egyptian royalty is Queen Hatshepsut who, prior to assuming the throne, purportedly recovered the baby Moses in a basket floating down the Nile River; and Pharaoh Thutmose III, with whom Moses evidently grew up as an adopted child of Hatshepsut. Around the corner from them in the museum crypt lies Amenhotep II, the Pharaoh who presided during the exodus of the Hebrews in the latter 1400s B.C. upon relenting (after ten plagues) to 80-year-old Moses’ demand from God (Exodus 9:1) to “let my people go.” That was a 40-year journey from Egypt to Israel that crossed the Red Sea and took a southern detour to Mount Sinai in the region of the COP27 conference.

The museum visit was not without controversy, as Rucker and Morano symbolically “glued” themselves to a display in the main hall of ancient Egyptian artifacts, and chanted in unison, “No net zero!  No green energy mandates!” This led to them being “removed” by security from the museum premises! (while pretending to be handcuffed, a la AOC.)

This theatrical stunt—which was done in jest—was to illustrate the lunacy of two recent attempts to desecrate artworks by twenty-something protestors to call attention to the supposed climate emergency. Thankfully, their attempt to destroy precious works of art were in vain since they were protected by airtight glass.

What does it say when young people have been told their whole lives that mankind is destroying the planet? At least some will resort to extreme behavior, including destroying art, laying down on busy highways to halt traffic, and other stunts of idiocy. Even worse, such behavior is funded by wealthy adults, including the A22 Network, financed in party by big oil heiress, Aileen Getty through the Climate Emergency Fund, and Hollywood billionaire Adam McKay.

Back to the Climate Summit, number 27. CFACT will be at the ready beginning early Monday morning, pushing back on the groupthink narrative, demanding actual facts, and challenging the climate gospel, which otherwise brooks no dissent. We also will be illustrating the massive hypocrisy on full display by virtue-signaling climate elites in attendance who lose nothing even as they demand sacrifice from the world’s poor and middle class by imposing ever-higher energy costs upon them.

Author

  • Peter Murphy

    Peter Murphy is Senior Fellow at CFACT. He has researched and advocated for a variety of policy issues, including education reform and fiscal policy, both in the non-profit sector and in government in the administration of former New York Governor George Pataki. He previously wrote and edited The Chalkboard weblog for the NY Charter Schools Association, and has been published in numerous media outlets, including The Hill, New York Post, Washington Times and the Wall Street Journal. Twitter: @PeterMurphy26 Website: https://www.petermurphylgs.com/