Global food production – and meat production in particular – threatens climate stability, claims a recent report from the intellectual elite. To save the planet from global warming, people will have to cut more than half the meat from their diets, the report claims.

Claiming the moral authority of the intellectual elite, the EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health report brags that its report draws from “37 leading scientists from 16 countries.” Following the dictates of these self-proclaimed leading scientists is absolutely necessary for “climate stability.”

The anti-meat agenda is gaining increasing traction among climate alarmists. As the EAT-Lancet commission claims, “Food is the single strongest lever to optimize … environmental sustainability on Earth.” Moreover, “Global food production threatens climate stability and ecosystem resilience and constitutes the single largest driver of environmental degradation and transgression of planetary boundaries.”

“Taken together the outcome is dire,” the report continues. “A radical transformation of the global food system is urgently needed. Without action, the world risks failing to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement.”

In an article titled, “Climate crisis needs radical food changes,” the Climate News Network website summarizes the article: “To contain global temperatures to no more than 2°C above the average for most of human history will require humanity to change its diet, contain its appetite and reform the entire system of food production and distribution.”

Harvard professor Walter Willett, who participated in the report, summarizes the commission’s goals accordingly: “Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%.”

To effectuate those goals, of course, will require more international government oversight and less individual freedom.

“The absence of globally agreed scientific targets for healthy diets and sustainable food production has hindered large-scale and coordinated efforts to transform the global food system,” the report claims. Producing the report “is the first attempt to set universal targets for the food system that apply to all people and the planet.”

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  • CFACT, founded in 1985 by Craig Rucker and the late (truly great) David Rothbard, examines the relationship between human freedom, and issues of energy, environment, climate, economics, civil rights and more.