Dear Lord, what were you thinking?

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen sings an ode to the benefits of federalism and other gifts from the founders in an article inspired by a jazz combo. He reports that the 2016 election was swung in "flyover country" out of a growing frustration with an ever-expanding federal government that had largely discarded the concept of federalism and was dictating too many aspects of our lives.

By |2018-02-14T00:35:05+00:00February 14th, 2018|CFACT Insights|3 Comments

Confiscating private land for frogs

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen warns that a pending Supreme Court case could leave property owners at the mercy of federal bureaucrats who would have absolute authority to order them to renovate their property to welcome endangered species -- at their own expense, even if the species was not native to the property.

By |2018-01-04T12:09:52+00:00January 4th, 2018|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Confiscating private land for frogs

A little slice of Alaskan tundra is finally open for drilling

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen extols the benefits of the opening some 2,000 acres of the huge Arctic National Wildlife Reserve to exploration and drilling for oil and gas. The potential for the region is at least 15 billion gallons of oil a year - more than enough to keep the Trans-Alaska Pipeline up and running for a long time to come.

By |2017-12-31T03:28:45+00:00December 31st, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Keystone is anti-hydrocarbon zealotry in microcosm

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen laments the long, arduous battle to open the Keystone XL pipeline -- an action that would eliminate the need for 1,225 railroad tanker cars per day (450,000 per year) or 3,500 semi-trailer tanker trucks daily (1,275,000 annually) that currently transport oil to refineries, saving lives and costs and creating jobs in rural America. Driessen also recounts the many ways that fossil fuels enrich humanity -- from feed stocks for paints, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and other products to powering the manufacturing centers that create computers, smart phones, healthcare technologies, vehicles, and batteries.

By |2017-12-15T11:28:28+00:00December 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

What natural disasters should teach us

Ugandan author Steven Lyazi scoffs at the chiding and covert racism of wealthy environmental advocates who live in luxury but demand a lower quality lifestyle for Africans. He points the finger at the Club of Rome for banning DDT once they realized that Africans not dying from malaria and other diseases would live longer and have more children. His words echo the toothless declarations that sustainable development restrictions should not apply to the very poor.

By |2017-09-29T12:47:45+00:00September 29th, 2017|Guest Insights|Comments Off on What natural disasters should teach us

The Hurricane Harvey hustle

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen quotes multiple climate scientists who explain that high-rainfall tropical storms have battered the Texas coast (and Florida) for generations of recorded history (and likely long before). Thus, the efforts to tie Hurricane Harvey to "climate change" are "disgraceful" -- and ignore the reality that Houston was built on impermeable clays and reclaimed swamp lands with a history of subsidence.

By |2017-09-10T10:14:01+00:00September 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Revisiting wind turbine impacts

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen corrects some assumptions in an earlier article about the energy, land, and materials requirements for creating a totally wind-powered United States. The numbers are staggering -- even though based on best-scenario assumptions. The real world situation would likely be much worse. Simply put, the goal of a 100% wind powered nation is a pipe dream.

By |2017-09-05T10:41:45+00:00September 4th, 2017|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

Life in fossil-fuel-free utopia

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen explains how life without fossil fuels will not be the utopian adventure that advocates for banning them claim. For starters, there would be no more wind turbines or solar arrays because fossil fuels are needed to construct, transport, and install them. Worse, the rest of the world will laugh as we turn backwards to the dark ages.

By |2017-08-16T17:09:48+00:00August 13th, 2017|CFACT Insights|8 Comments

“The Uncertainty Has Settled”

CFACT highly recommends showing this film to friends and neighbors. Marijm Poels is an honest man. The kind of person who can bring reconciliation through exposing the truth for all to see. We salute this work.

By |2017-07-11T19:07:46+00:00July 11th, 2017|Climate, Media, Videos|Comments Off on “The Uncertainty Has Settled”

Land, energy, and mineral lockdowns

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen lauds President Trump's call for a review of recent land withdrawals under the Antiquities Act -- as do residents of western states whose economic and personal freedom has been severely impinged by these heartless actions by grandstanding Presidents. While federal agencies own just 0.3% of Connecticut and Iowa, and 0.6% of New York, they own, manage and control 63% of all land in Utah; 61% in Alaska and Idaho; 80% in Nevada; 29% to 53% in the other western states. Restrictive federal land use policies severely affect job creation and economic opportunities for states, communities, families and our nation as a whole, for little environmental benefit.

By |2017-05-14T02:44:32+00:00May 14th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Refocusing a Chicago water summit

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen chides the conferees at the upcoming water summit in Chicago to admit that the ongoing hysteria over "climate change" has distracted regulatory agencies and state and local governments fromaddressing much more significant issues related to clean water (and others as well). The economic malaise that resulted from Obama's war on coal -- and thus on coal miners -- has led to an unprecedented increase in opioid addiction that is just one sign of the assault on families conducted in the name of climate change. Meanwhile, Milwaukee dumps unrtreated wastewater and sewage into Lake Michigan, and many U.S. cities have failing water and wastewater systems taht might have been updated had it not been for the monies redirected toward enriching global warming advocates.

By |2017-05-08T12:31:32+00:00May 8th, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Refocusing a Chicago water summit

Executive order ends Monumental land grabs

As the environmental movement unfolded, Presidents courting green votes have increasingly used the Antiquities Act of 1906 to sequester large swaths of land -- and water -- from future public and private use -- all too often without the advice and consent of elected officials and citizen groups. These seizures have cost states and private citizens the use of these properties, and the revenue and enjoyment that come from such uses. President Trump's executive order is step 1 in putting a stop to these unpopular land grabs and hopefully to reopening noncritical acreage to a variety of human uses.

By |2017-05-01T18:17:06+00:00May 1st, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Executive order ends Monumental land grabs

Green energy poverty week

April 22 is Earth Day, the March for Science, and Lenin’s birthday (which many say is appropriate, since environmentalism is now green on the outside and red, anti-­free enterprise on the inside). April 29 will feature the People’s Climate March. The Climate March website says these forces of “The Resistance” intend to show President Trump they will fight his hated energy agenda every step of the way. Science March organizers say they won’t tolerate anyone who tries to “skew, ignore, misuse or interfere with science.” After eight years of government policies that killed jobs and economic growth – and skewed, ignored, [...]

By |2017-04-24T02:00:43+00:00April 22nd, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Green energy poverty week

Five key reasons to pull plug on wind subsidies

CFACT advisor Larry Bell argues that the time has come to end the so-called production tax credit for wind turbines that produce intermittent power, require major balancing of the grid, require constant maintenance, devastate bat and bird populations and create health problems for nearby residents, and increase the cost of energy to all.

By |2017-03-06T16:24:09+00:00March 6th, 2017|CFACT Insights|69 Comments

Science deniers in the wind industry

By Helen Schwiesow Parker, P.hD., LCP Like the tobacco industry before it, the wind industry has spent decades vehemently denying known harmful consequences associated with its product, while promoting its fraudulent feel-good image. Dismissing or denying the serious health impacts of industrial-scale wind turbines is wishful thinking, akin to insisting that tobacco is harmless because we enjoy it. The problem with wind energy is not just its costly, subsidized, unreliable electricity; the need to back up every megawatt with redundant fossil-fuel power; or its impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Infrasound (inaudible) and low-frequency (audible) noise (slowly vibrating sound waves collectively [...]

By |2017-03-03T19:45:17+00:00March 3rd, 2017|Guest Insights|11 Comments
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