EPA leads in open science

Many researchers (or their institutions) are likely to want their work to be EPA usable, even if EPA does not fund it. They will then adopt usability practices from the beginning, which may be a new way of doing research. This is exactly what the open science movement is calling for.

By |2018-05-14T13:20:46+00:00May 15th, 2018|Regulation|Comments Off on EPA leads in open science

Preventing government data failures

Data specialist Justhy Deva Prasad encourages the better use of available data -- with appropriate action the data call for -- by governments in particular to protect citizens from dangerous threats to their health and safety. He further shows how the failure to properly use data in disaster prevention strategies yielded bad results from Fukushima, Superstorm Sandy, ongoing California wildfires, andOroville Dam. And public officials should be held accountable for their failures.

By |2018-02-20T16:15:51+00:00February 20th, 2018|Guest Insights|Comments Off on Preventing government data failures

Lease the OCS – to benefit all Americans

As CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen explains, federal revenues from offshore drilling fell from $18 billion in 2008 to just $2.5 billion in 2016 thanks largely to Obama era policies while state revenues from closer-in rigs went up. The Trump-Zinke proposal would open federal waters (outside the 3-mile limit) to drilling, with huge potential revenues and contributions to national security. The planning and evaluation process, Driessen argues, should not be impeded.

By |2018-02-10T15:43:18+00:00February 10th, 2018|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Lease the OCS – to benefit all Americans

Keystone is anti-hydrocarbon zealotry in microcosm

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen laments the long, arduous battle to open the Keystone XL pipeline -- an action that would eliminate the need for 1,225 railroad tanker cars per day (450,000 per year) or 3,500 semi-trailer tanker trucks daily (1,275,000 annually) that currently transport oil to refineries, saving lives and costs and creating jobs in rural America. Driessen also recounts the many ways that fossil fuels enrich humanity -- from feed stocks for paints, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and other products to powering the manufacturing centers that create computers, smart phones, healthcare technologies, vehicles, and batteries.

By |2017-12-15T11:28:28+00:00December 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

End the ‘war on coal’

New Zealander Bryan Leyland and Canadian Tom Harris, both of the International Climate Science Coalition, argue that the United States is setting a bad example and harming its own people -- and those in developing nations -- by continuing the EPA's war on coal, nuclear energy, and natural gas. Wind and solar have major problems with reliability, cost, and adverse health and environmental impacts that their proponents gloss over, whereas emissions from modern, highly efficient coal-fired power plants with stack gas cleanup consist almost entirely of water, CO2, and nitrogen.

By |2017-12-08T21:06:28+00:00December 8th, 2017|Guest Insights|8 Comments

UN agency to Congress: Drop dead

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen weighs in on the attempt by the International Agency for Research on Cancer to shut down sales and use of glyphosate despite numerous studies showing that the world's most commonly used herbicide does not cause cancer. Indeed, Driessen notes, even the process by which the IARC made its determination is fatally flawed.

By |2017-12-03T19:42:30+00:00December 3rd, 2017|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

Sharing our blessings

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen wishes the entire world a happy time of thanksgiving -- for the fossil fuels, hydroelectric power, and other contributions to reliable, affordable energy that has powered a dramatic shift in life expectancy and standards of living and world health, lifting billions out of poverty. He further challenges us to extend these blessings to the billions who even today lack the blessings of energy, in part because of elitist, eco-imperialist refusal to underwrite the financing of anything but renewable energy that is unreliable, expensive, and only in some cases the best (short-term) option.

By |2017-11-26T10:43:49+00:00November 26th, 2017|CFACT Insights|13 Comments

Trump’s failing revolution

Scot Faulkner assesses the Trump Administration, noting that the President has failed to bring on board people who would actually carry out his agenda and instead has surrounded himself with Never-Trumpers whose goal is to block his agenda.

By |2017-11-16T17:35:50+00:00November 16th, 2017|Guest Insights, News, Op-Ed Articles|Comments Off on Trump’s failing revolution

Looking for a Big Easy windfall

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen explains how the election of trial lawyer buddy John Bel Edwards as Governor of Louisiana has paved the way for Green lawsuits against oil and gas companies that are nothing more than shakedowns -- claiming the energy industry as a whole is responsible for coastal land erosion in the state.

By |2017-10-25T13:19:21+00:00October 24th, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Looking for a Big Easy windfall

Pruitt’s EPA ends “sue and settle” gravy train sham

CFACT policy analyst Larry Bell reports that President Trump's EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has dealt a death blow to the scurrilous practice of the EPA colluding with interest groups to alter public policy through staged litigation that denies opponents of their punitive schemes no opportunity for their own day in court.

By |2017-10-23T14:32:35+00:00October 23rd, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Pruitt’s EPA ends “sue and settle” gravy train sham

Politicized sustainability threatens planet and people

Paul Driessen, author of "Eco-Imperialism: Green Power, Black Death," explains the vast difference between Real Sustainability, which implies wisely using our resources and always looking to innovate, and Politicized Sustainability, a radical policy that focuses on focuses on ridding the world of fossil fuels, regardless of any social, economic, environmental, or human costs of doing so -- and regardless of whether supposed alternatives really are eco-friendly and sustainable.

By |2017-10-11T14:07:09+00:00October 8th, 2017|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

EPA endangerment finding endangers USA

The U.S. Supreme Court fell for junk science when it approved the EPA's "finding" that carbon dioxide is the chief driver of global climate change, notes CFACT advisor Dennis T. Avery. The EPA models have all been proven false using historical and current data, and thus there is no scientific underpinning for this jobs-killing, energy-crushing decision. The hope is that, with Justice Neil Gorsuch now on the bench, the Court will overturn its own "Endangerment" finding.

By |2017-10-03T13:14:28+00:00October 3rd, 2017|Guest Insights|66 Comments

Transparency critical to getting science, regulations right

CFACT science and policy advisor H. Sterling Burnett of the Heartland Institute reports that the EPA (and other federal agencies) skew the real cost-benefit numbers in promoting massive regulations. One example: While the Obama Clean Power Plan might have saved 21,000 lives (as the EPA claimed), the rules would also also resulted in from 102,500 to 164,000 early deaths. The HONEST Act hopes to correct these discrepancies.

By |2017-08-26T15:23:37+00:00August 26th, 2017|Op-Ed Articles|Comments Off on Transparency critical to getting science, regulations right

Biofuel justifications are illusory

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen explains why the renewable fuel standard is out of touch with today's energy realities -- the ethanol mandates, including for cellulosic ethanol -- far exceed even the perceived need. Ethanol ruins gasoline mileage, and gasoline cut with 15% ethanol ruins older automobile and truck engines (pre-2007) and almost all small gasoline-powered engines (including outboard motors, lawnmowers, and more).

By |2017-08-04T14:24:38+00:00July 29th, 2017|CFACT Insights|11 Comments
Load More Posts