The climate alarmist website Grist asked its readers (https://grist.org/article/how-has-climate-change-affected-you-in-2019/) to describe how climate changed their lives in in 2019. In a newly published article, Grist published its readers responses (https://grist.org/living/we-asked-you-answered-heres-how-the-climate-changed-your-lives-in-2019/). Far from providing scientific evidence of harmful global warming, the article instead illustrated how alarmists have discarded the Scientific Method and credited the subjective assessments of lay persons for sound science. According to the comments submitted by Grist readers, global warming is the 21st century version of 19th century snake oil – capable of absolutely anything, despite scientific evidence to the contrary.

I work on climate change, and it has taken a toll on me mentally this year: I’ve felt both filled to the brim with hope and depleted with despair,” was the top reader response reported by Grist.

Furnace couldn’t keep up during February polar vortex, and we had 11” of snow before leaves finished falling in November,” was the second published response.

Seasonal changes have been “off.” Very cold and wet in May, slowing planting in our short season. Then October brought early snow, forcing apple harvest before ripening. November, so far, has been our October. November is usually wet, but no precipitation in rain or snow to speak of,” was the next response.

According to the fourth reader response, “I live in a small city just north of Seattle, WA. When I moved into my house in early 1997, I began planting a large veggie garden. There was ample rainfall so I did not need to water the veggies and berries. About three years ago, we began having very hot, dry summers, which required heavy watering of my veg and berries and fruit trees. Because water rates are high and increasing for the past two years, I have not grown a veg garden, and have let my berry vines wither. Currently in the PNW we are now 4+ inches short of the historical rainfall, with no end in sight. I ration water, aim to drive no more than 150 miles/month, and caution everyone about the impending shortage of fresh water. I am alarmed.”

Let’s break these down.

Reader response one: A reader claiming that she is suffering a mental health toll about climate change is not proof – or even minimal evidence – of climate harm. It is merely an example of alarmists scaring people into suffering mental health harms.

Reader response two: An early onset of winter, along with very cold winter temperatures, is the opposite of what human-caused global warming theory suggests.

Reader response three: Again, an early onset of winter is the opposite of what human-caused global warming theory suggests. Moreover, claims that climate change caused disruption to the apple crop is contradicted by objected data showing apple production is setting records (https://keprtv.com/news/local/washingtons-apple-crop-one-for-the-record-books) nearly every year as the climate continues its modest warming.

Reader response four: Claims of drought around Seattle, Washington, defy Grist’s own article that invited reader responses. According to Grist’s article, “The Pacific Northwest is looking at a rainy future.” Just like 19th century snake oil, global warming is responsible for everything, including defying Grist’s own alarmist climate predictions. Moreover, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports that drought in 2017 affected a smaller percentage of the United States than during any other time in recorded history (https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2017/04/27/us-drought-record-low/100971018/) – during the same time period the reader blames global warming for an alleged drought.

So yes, Grist can publish an article titled, “We asked, you answered: Here’s how the climate changed your lives in 2019,” but the substance of the article provided no more credible vidence of harmful global warming than snake oil salesmen provide credible evidence of snake oil’s miracle powers in their dishonest sales pitches.

Author

  • James M. Taylor is an American lawyer, senior fellow for environment and energy policy at The Heartland Institute and a CFACT contributor. James Taylor is a keen analyst of science and public policy and a competition level poker player.