Energy

  • Oil and gas exports—one policy change, many benefits

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    “Businesses that sell to foreign markets put more people to work in high-quality jobs, offering more Americans the chance to earn a decent wage,” claimed the Obama Administration’s Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker in a March 18 Wall Street Journal (WSJ) opinion piece. She makes a strong case for U.S. exports: “jobs in export-intensive industries […]

  • Solar power propaganda vs. the real world

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    If the U.S. continues on its current path, electricity rates are going to skyrocket (as President Obama promised) and there will be massive power outages because of the shutdown of coal- and natural gas-fired power plants. Energy poverty is America’s future — and we know this based on the German experience. There, because of the nation’s high renewables requirements, electricity prices have already more than doubled — and Germans are building new coal-fired power plants to address the intermittency of solar energy (which is often nonexistent in winter).

  • What’s up with the prices at the pump?

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    Oil prices at the pump fell hard, then began creeping back up — even though crude oil prices have not rebounded. One reason is an explosion at an ExxonMobil refinery in California that has bumped that state’s price by 20 cents a gallon, but if the steelworkers union strike expands the impacts could grow . Meanwhile, the Saudis, who concocted the scheme that saw the dramatic drop in prices, are happy to see the rise in the price at the pump.

  • Naming enemies of U.S. fossil fuel development

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    The enemies of fracking, the Keystone pipeline, and other fossil fuel related activities start with wild-eyed “Deep Green Resistance” types who oppose the entirety of Western civilization (even agriculture), include those with vested interests in alternative energy sources, and even include foreign governments (like Putin’s Russia), who recognize that cheaper oil and gas prices will hurt their economies and weaken their grip on nearby dependent countries. Naming enemies empowers those who want to defeat them.

  • What’s next for the Keystone pipeline?

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    President Obama will soon have to decide whether to please big labor or Big Green — and his risk is that if he chooses Big Green over big labor and then the labor unions push Democrats who depend on their votes to vote to override his veto of the Keystone Pipeline authorization, he loses big time. The clock is ticking — and the stakes are high. Meanwhile, President-in-waiting Hillary Clinton is silent … perhaps fearing the same Hobson’s choice. The huge drop in the oil price — which some now claim is a further reason to ignore Keystone — is on the verge of a quick rebound thanks to Obama’s feckless foreign “policy.” Stay tuned!

  • Will President Obama’s new drilling policy give the Arctic over to Russian domination?

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    Is it merely a coincidence that millions of dollars of Russian money have been laundered and forwarded to anti-fossil fuel radical environmentalists to fight exploration and development by the United States of Alaska’s vast oil and gas and minerals reserves? While Russia plans to seize the entire Arctic for its own use, the United States shuts down all future development over nearly 20 million acres of land and sea — for absolutely zero environmental benefit, especially since Russia will likely be able to exploit much of that same territory anyway. Just as bac, Obama did this despite universal opposition from Alaska’s elected officials — robbing the state of much-needed jobs and revenues. Hopefully, this theft and giveaway to Russia can be reversed.

  • OPEC prediction of $200-a-barrel oil ignores market realities—or maybe not

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    OPEC’s Secretary General Abdulla al-Badri last month predicted oil prices will rebound to as much as $200 per barrel, a figure CFACT advisor Marita Noon suggests could only come about if terrorism and internal strife force shutdowns of major oil-producing states such as al-Badri’s native Libya and other Middle Eastern nations vulnerable to radical assaults. Otherwise, Noon notes, as soon as the price jumps about $70 per barrel, the nimble U.S. wildcatters will step up their production again and hold the oil price well below al-Badri’s predicted $200 per barrel.

  • Divesting people of better living standards

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    The radical Green push for colleges and universities to divest themselves from investment in fossil fuel companies is misguided, immoral, lethal, and, yes, racist. While Western civilization has seen an 11-fold increase in wealth, a doubling of lifespans, and health and prosperity unprecedented in human history, nearly 1.5 billion still live without the benefits of modern technology. While China (which will ignore the bigots) has linked nearly its entire population to the power grid, over 300 million in India and more than twice that number in sub-Saharan Africa lack even the simplest of modern amenities that electric power and motorized transportation afford. CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen asks, “What right do divestment activists and climate change alarmists have to deny Earth’s most destitute people access to electricity and motor fuels, jobs, and better lives?”

  • I come to bury renewable fuel standards

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    The federal ethanol mandate mut be rescinded, say CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen. Nearly 40% of the U.S. corn crop is devoted to ethanol, and this requires enormous amounts of irrigation water, fertilizers, pesticides, and gasoline or diesel fuel to grow, harvest, and ship the corn — and then to ship the ethanol. While corn growers are protected by the mandate, they are making money — but at the expense of chicken, turkey, egg, and hog farmers who are paying an extra $100 billion a year in feed costs. Moreover, energy from oil and gas drilling is much less harmful to the environment — especially given the high usage of water, the unbearable flow of life-killing nutrients into the Gulf of Mexico, and of course the negative impacts on gasoline and diesel engines from the added ethanol (and the lower miles per gallon it delivers). It is time, says Driessen, to bury the Renewable Fuel Standard and the ethanol subsidies.

  • U.S. light dimmed with Obama energy policy

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    Energy policy analyst Marita Noon, a CFACT advisor, points out that India has no intention of kowtowing to political correctness in developing its energy sector. Instead, “India rejects arguments by Green activists that it must move away from coal energy, saying the alternative would be to keep its citizens in poverty.” Meanwhile, President Obama is intent on creating energy poverty in the U.S. through a regulatory assault on coal, oil and gas, and other conventional energy producers — on top of his intention to veto legislation authorizing the Keystone pipeline. Should he get his way, Americans will be anticipating blackouts and brownouts and higher energy prices across the board to go along with the energy shortages his policies are sure to create.

  • EPA uses junk science to wage war on coal

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    The Obama Administration, through the corrupted Environmental Protection Agency, promised to kill the U.S. coal industry and they are already far along toward their goal. Along with it, they are wreaking havoc on the U.S. economy and threatening power outages of mammoth proportions. To justify this, they cite so-called scientific studies that are kept secret so that their findings cannot be easily challenged. But there’s more — other job-killing regulations also not backed by sound, peer reviewable science — that will take the U.S. further away from long-term prosperity. Can this onslaught be stopped or even slowed down?

  • Wind energy’s bluster peters out

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    The uncertainty of the future of the wind energy production tax credit is but one reason that wind turbine projects are falling apart. Cape Wind, the huge Massachusetts project opposed by the Kennedy clan, now looks dead after two power companies filed to withdraw their contracts because the investors missed deadlines. Minnesota’s Minwind project is now bankrupt because the investors cannot even afford the maintenance costs.

  • Vetoing bipartisan energy, job, and economic growth

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    CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen says that the Obama Administration is continuing, even revving up, its campaign against domestic energy production with new EPA regulations on the horizon that would shutter much of the nation’s coal industry and do great harm to oil and gas production; he also promised to veto any legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Moreover, the Obama progressive mentality is so pervaseive that international lending and donor agencies (the UN, OPIC, etc.) are holding poor, developing countries hostage to wind, solar, and biofuel projects that cannot lift them out of poverty — and thus these elites are damning the world’s poorest people to eternal poverty when true prosperity through fossil fuels is staring them in the face.

  • The oil price is not the price of oil

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    Accordinng to petroleum engineer Sel Graham, the real oil price is NOT the price of oil as prophesied by Wall Street speculators. The U.S. oil price has been consistently lower than the price for foreign oil. Thus, Graham says, the best policy for the U.S. is to continue to increase domestic production until we are no longer dependent on more expensive foreign oil.