Dear Lord, what were you thinking?

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen sings an ode to the benefits of federalism and other gifts from the founders in an article inspired by a jazz combo. He reports that the 2016 election was swung in "flyover country" out of a growing frustration with an ever-expanding federal government that had largely discarded the concept of federalism and was dictating too many aspects of our lives.

By |2018-02-14T00:35:05+00:00February 14th, 2018|CFACT Insights|3 Comments

Keystone is anti-hydrocarbon zealotry in microcosm

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen laments the long, arduous battle to open the Keystone XL pipeline -- an action that would eliminate the need for 1,225 railroad tanker cars per day (450,000 per year) or 3,500 semi-trailer tanker trucks daily (1,275,000 annually) that currently transport oil to refineries, saving lives and costs and creating jobs in rural America. Driessen also recounts the many ways that fossil fuels enrich humanity -- from feed stocks for paints, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and other products to powering the manufacturing centers that create computers, smart phones, healthcare technologies, vehicles, and batteries.

By |2017-12-15T11:28:28+00:00December 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Trumping the State Department

Former Reagan Administration official Scot Faulkner lauds President Trump's and Secretary of State Tillerson's plans to overhaul the U.S. State Department, which he calls not only one of the most bloated bureaucracies but also one of the least effective -- largely because of the internationalist -- almost anti-American -- attitude that prevails among senior officials. USAID alone has wasted over a trillion dollars on enriching dictators and useless projects that have not produced lasting results. It is way past time to clean house.

By |2017-03-27T01:36:08+00:00March 27th, 2017|Guest Insights|Comments Off on Trumping the State Department

Antiquities Act, eminent domain threaten American families

Some 500 families were relocated 80 years ago when the federal government used the Antiquities Act of 1906 to create Shenandoah National Park. Today, a private company is seeking to use eminent domain (despite having an alternate route) to destroy farmland and displace or negatively impact about 2,700 families. There is a better way.

By |2016-09-18T09:35:27+00:00September 17th, 2016|Environment, General Information, Property|Comments Off on Antiquities Act, eminent domain threaten American families

Hudson Valley landowners’ 22-year battle against New York land trusts

The fat cats who run land trusts actually believe they are entitled to anyone else's property just because they want it ... and in the case of the former Smitty's Dude Ranch in upstate New York, they have fought low down and dirty over the past 30 years to seize property that 28 years ago was sold, under a deed upheld many times in court, to a couple of modest means. Decency is not in the vocabulary of these modern day robber barons, who finally won a judicial victory after 22 years of fraudulent efforts, ridiculous claims, and other methods designed to destroy the ability of the owners to fight back.

By |2016-04-29T13:05:37+00:00April 29th, 2016|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Hudson Valley landowners’ 22-year battle against New York land trusts

The persistent popularity of property rights

While you rarely hear about it in the news, property rights continues to be a popular issue for most Americans—so popular that enterprising policy makers and others in the public policy arena could use this often overlooked issue to significant effect.

By |2016-01-12T15:57:02+00:00January 12th, 2016|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on The persistent popularity of property rights

Property owners stand up to National Park Service bullying

Tom and Kathy Stocklen fought the National Park Service for over 40 years and retired with their property intact, despite repeated efforts, even threats, by NPS bureaucrats to take their land in Michigan's Sleeping Bear Dunes Natioanl Lakeshore. Curiously, the NPS has recently ended four decades of dredging the Platte River, where the Stocklens placed their canoes, for safe navigation. Clearly, Washington thinks that landowners are public nuisances.

By |2015-08-20T08:07:17+00:00August 19th, 2015|Guest Insights|Comments Off on Property owners stand up to National Park Service bullying

“Farming in Fear” Watch the trailer

"Farming in Fear" pieces together Martha's story from interviews and documentation, tracking the nearly 10-year ordeal she's gone through just to earn a living in spite of corrupt local ordinances, abusive management of her conservation easement, and personal attacks through the introduction of an amendment to Virginia's Right to Farm Act called the 'Boneta Bill', designed to protect small farmers so that what happened to Martha never happens again.

By |2015-07-15T11:08:58+00:00July 15th, 2015|Videos|5 Comments
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