Connecticut votes to end costly solar subsidies

Despite vehement opposition from the solar industry lobby, the bill sailed through both chambers of Connecticut’s legislature, passing the state Senate by a vote of 29-3 before passing the House 100-45 in the same week. Malloy, the state’s outgoing Democratic governor, is widely expected to turn the bill into law given his office introduced the measure.

By |2018-05-10T21:03:19+00:00May 12th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Connecticut votes to end costly solar subsidies

Our next energy and security crisis?

Oil and natural gas aren’t just fuels. They supply building blocks for pharmaceuticals; plastics in vehicle bodies, athletic helmets, and numerous other products; and complex composites in solar panels and wind turbine blades and nacelles. The U.S. was importing 65% of its petroleum in 2005, creating serious national security concerns. But fracking helped cut imports to 40% and the U.S. now exports oil and gas. Today’s vital raw materials foundation also includes exotic minerals like gallium, germanium, rare-earth elements, and platinum-group metals. For the U.S., they are “critical” because they are required in thousands of applications; they become “strategic” when we don’t [...]

By |2018-02-27T01:19:52+00:00February 27th, 2018|CFACT Insights, Uncategorized|3 Comments

Renewable energy – by royal decree!

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen exposes the shame of the city leaders in St. Louis, Missouri, who have sought to deflect from the city's poor reputation for violent crime, high school graduation rates, and overall quality of life by declaring the city MUST transform its power base from 1.5% wind and solar today to 100% wind and solar within the next 18 years. The staggering cost of such a transformation, assuming it can even be done, will be borne by the very people who suffer from high crime, low-performance education, and a sense of hopelessness in the face of arrogant posturing.

By |2017-11-06T12:40:36+00:00November 6th, 2017|CFACT Insights, Energy|3 Comments

The changing world energy economy

West Virginia University professor James E. Smith and graduate student Alex Hatch report that the United States economy has begun to grow steadily despite falling oil consumption. Moreover, worldwide energy demand dropped significantly between 2013 and 2015 and the trend is continuing despite growing world populations and expanding energy availability. They note that , worldwide (not just in today's rich countries), the only thing limiting our future progress and comity is our imagination and ingenuity.

By |2017-11-02T11:21:18+00:00November 2nd, 2017|Guest Insights|7 Comments

Wind power questioned by a well-reasoned website

There are a number of good websites that question the prevailing dogma on wind farms, but few actually engage in teaching. The Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions (AWED) is a gem in this regard. Not only does the site shine with careful reasoning, it actually teaches how to make clear and convincing arguments.

By |2017-10-23T21:50:04+00:00October 23rd, 2017|Energy|Comments Off on Wind power questioned by a well-reasoned website

Politicized sustainability threatens planet and people

Paul Driessen, author of "Eco-Imperialism: Green Power, Black Death," explains the vast difference between Real Sustainability, which implies wisely using our resources and always looking to innovate, and Politicized Sustainability, a radical policy that focuses on focuses on ridding the world of fossil fuels, regardless of any social, economic, environmental, or human costs of doing so -- and regardless of whether supposed alternatives really are eco-friendly and sustainable.

By |2017-10-11T14:07:09+00:00October 8th, 2017|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

The Hurricane Harvey hustle

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen quotes multiple climate scientists who explain that high-rainfall tropical storms have battered the Texas coast (and Florida) for generations of recorded history (and likely long before). Thus, the efforts to tie Hurricane Harvey to "climate change" are "disgraceful" -- and ignore the reality that Houston was built on impermeable clays and reclaimed swamp lands with a history of subsidence.

By |2017-09-10T10:14:01+00:00September 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Transparency critical to getting science, regulations right

CFACT science and policy advisor H. Sterling Burnett of the Heartland Institute reports that the EPA (and other federal agencies) skew the real cost-benefit numbers in promoting massive regulations. One example: While the Obama Clean Power Plan might have saved 21,000 lives (as the EPA claimed), the rules would also also resulted in from 102,500 to 164,000 early deaths. The HONEST Act hopes to correct these discrepancies.

By |2017-08-26T15:23:37+00:00August 26th, 2017|Op-Ed Articles|Comments Off on Transparency critical to getting science, regulations right

Life in fossil-fuel-free utopia

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen explains how life without fossil fuels will not be the utopian adventure that advocates for banning them claim. For starters, there would be no more wind turbines or solar arrays because fossil fuels are needed to construct, transport, and install them. Worse, the rest of the world will laugh as we turn backwards to the dark ages.

By |2017-08-16T17:09:48+00:00August 13th, 2017|CFACT Insights|8 Comments
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