Failing the laugh test: Wind, solar power make subsidy accusations

The wind and solar power industries each receive such enormous taxpayer subsidies that all other energy industries combined do not receive as much taxpayer pork as either wind or solar power alone. Big renewable has no interest in sharing.

By |2018-07-26T15:11:29+00:00July 29th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Failing the laugh test: Wind, solar power make subsidy accusations

30-years later, James Hansen blasts renewables

Hansen: “The notion that renewable energies and batteries alone will provide all needed energy is fantastical. It is also a grotesque idea, because of the staggering environmental pollution from mining and material disposal, if all energy was derived from renewables and batteries.”

By |2018-07-08T07:23:35+00:00July 8th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on 30-years later, James Hansen blasts renewables

Ontario teaches what not to do on energy

Dr. Tim Ball and Tom Harris To fix the province’s woes, new Conservative Premier Doug Ford must first understand the causes of the problems. A major issue has been crippling energy and environmental policies.

By |2018-06-28T11:21:04+00:00June 28th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Ontario teaches what not to do on energy

Connecticut votes to end costly solar subsidies

Despite vehement opposition from the solar industry lobby, the bill sailed through both chambers of Connecticut’s legislature, passing the state Senate by a vote of 29-3 before passing the House 100-45 in the same week. Malloy, the state’s outgoing Democratic governor, is widely expected to turn the bill into law given his office introduced the measure.

By |2018-05-10T21:03:19+00:00May 12th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Connecticut votes to end costly solar subsidies

Our next energy and security crisis?

Oil and natural gas aren’t just fuels. They supply building blocks for pharmaceuticals; plastics in vehicle bodies, athletic helmets, and numerous other products; and complex composites in solar panels and wind turbine blades and nacelles. The U.S. was importing 65% of its petroleum in 2005, creating serious national security concerns. But fracking helped cut imports to 40% and the U.S. now exports oil and gas. Today’s vital raw materials foundation also includes exotic minerals like gallium, germanium, rare-earth elements, and platinum-group metals. For the U.S., they are “critical” because they are required in thousands of applications; they become “strategic” when we don’t [...]

By |2018-02-27T01:19:52+00:00February 27th, 2018|CFACT Insights, Uncategorized|3 Comments

Renewable energy – by royal decree!

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen exposes the shame of the city leaders in St. Louis, Missouri, who have sought to deflect from the city's poor reputation for violent crime, high school graduation rates, and overall quality of life by declaring the city MUST transform its power base from 1.5% wind and solar today to 100% wind and solar within the next 18 years. The staggering cost of such a transformation, assuming it can even be done, will be borne by the very people who suffer from high crime, low-performance education, and a sense of hopelessness in the face of arrogant posturing.

By |2017-11-06T12:40:36+00:00November 6th, 2017|CFACT Insights, Energy|3 Comments

The changing world energy economy

West Virginia University professor James E. Smith and graduate student Alex Hatch report that the United States economy has begun to grow steadily despite falling oil consumption. Moreover, worldwide energy demand dropped significantly between 2013 and 2015 and the trend is continuing despite growing world populations and expanding energy availability. They note that , worldwide (not just in today's rich countries), the only thing limiting our future progress and comity is our imagination and ingenuity.

By |2017-11-02T11:21:18+00:00November 2nd, 2017|Guest Insights|7 Comments
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