The changing world energy economy

West Virginia University professor James E. Smith and graduate student Alex Hatch report that the United States economy has begun to grow steadily despite falling oil consumption. Moreover, worldwide energy demand dropped significantly between 2013 and 2015 and the trend is continuing despite growing world populations and expanding energy availability. They note that , worldwide (not just in today's rich countries), the only thing limiting our future progress and comity is our imagination and ingenuity.

By |2017-11-02T11:21:18+00:00November 2nd, 2017|Guest Insights|7 Comments

Revisiting wind turbine impacts

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen corrects some assumptions in an earlier article about the energy, land, and materials requirements for creating a totally wind-powered United States. The numbers are staggering -- even though based on best-scenario assumptions. The real world situation would likely be much worse. Simply put, the goal of a 100% wind powered nation is a pipe dream.

By |2017-09-05T10:41:45+00:00September 4th, 2017|CFACT Insights|2 Comments

Nipping a legal problem in the bud

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen urges EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to revise the review process for threatened and endangered species to include broad-based Extending the review beyond the litigants and the agencies to include all parties impacted by the designation to have a voice. Only then can the review incorporate all the topics addressed by experts and affected parties -- people who can help evaluate the science and policy implications for the affected species, as well as for farming, construction, jobs, families, and other species. This article focuses on recent designations of bumble bees.

By |2017-05-27T18:45:18+00:00May 27th, 2017|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Nipping a legal problem in the bud
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