The Northeast’s pipeline pinch

Why are New England states paying more for natural gas than surrounding states (sometimes a LOT more) when the Marcellus and Utica Shale plays are nearby? WATCH NOW

By |2019-04-25T23:23:46-04:00April 27th, 2019|Energy|Comments Off on The Northeast’s pipeline pinch

New England starved for natural gas despite world boom

There is no evidence that restrictions on New England usage will have a measurable effect on world demand for natural gas, or the slightest effect on global temperatures. But misguided government energy policies will raise prices for New England residents.

By |2019-04-09T15:03:20-04:00April 12th, 2019|Energy|Comments Off on New England starved for natural gas despite world boom

America is an increasingly minor CO2 emitter

The United States and Western democracies as a whole are increasingly minor players among global carbon dioxide emitters, U.S. EPA data show. Without dramatic emissions reductions in China, India, and other developing nations, dramatic reductions in the United States, Western Europe, and Japan will have little impact on global carbon dioxide emissions. According to EPA data (https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/global-greenhouse-gas-emissions-data), the United States, Western Europe, and Japan account for a cumulative 28% of global carbon dioxide emissions. China alone accounts for 30%, India accounts for 7%, and the rest of the world cumulatively accounts for 35%. The share of global emissions from the United [...]

By |2018-06-02T08:21:34-04:00June 4th, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on America is an increasingly minor CO2 emitter

Apologies to New England for Cuomo raising energy prices

Republican Sen. Robert Ortt of New York criticized the state’s Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo Wednesday for unambiguously opposing natural gas production while citizens contend with rolling blackouts and expensive energy prices.

By |2018-06-02T07:57:19-04:00June 2nd, 2018|Energy|Comments Off on Apologies to New England for Cuomo raising energy prices

Those fraudulent climate litigation shakedowns

CFACT Senior Policy Advisor Paul Driessen warns that the impending lawsuits against oil and gas companies -- created by corrupt city governments as a last-gasp hope for escaping bankruptcy -- pose grave danger for the U.S. economy should these cities succeed. Yet, says Driessen, the very premises of these suits suggests they should be thrown out of court.

By |2018-03-08T15:58:54-04:00March 8th, 2018|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Those fraudulent climate litigation shakedowns

Lease the OCS – to benefit all Americans

As CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen explains, federal revenues from offshore drilling fell from $18 billion in 2008 to just $2.5 billion in 2016 thanks largely to Obama era policies while state revenues from closer-in rigs went up. The Trump-Zinke proposal would open federal waters (outside the 3-mile limit) to drilling, with huge potential revenues and contributions to national security. The planning and evaluation process, Driessen argues, should not be impeded.

By |2018-02-10T15:43:18-04:00February 10th, 2018|CFACT Insights|Comments Off on Lease the OCS – to benefit all Americans

A little slice of Alaskan tundra is finally open for drilling

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen extols the benefits of the opening some 2,000 acres of the huge Arctic National Wildlife Reserve to exploration and drilling for oil and gas. The potential for the region is at least 15 billion gallons of oil a year - more than enough to keep the Trans-Alaska Pipeline up and running for a long time to come.

By |2017-12-31T03:28:45-04:00December 31st, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment

Keystone is anti-hydrocarbon zealotry in microcosm

CFACT Senior Policy Analyst Paul Driessen laments the long, arduous battle to open the Keystone XL pipeline -- an action that would eliminate the need for 1,225 railroad tanker cars per day (450,000 per year) or 3,500 semi-trailer tanker trucks daily (1,275,000 annually) that currently transport oil to refineries, saving lives and costs and creating jobs in rural America. Driessen also recounts the many ways that fossil fuels enrich humanity -- from feed stocks for paints, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and other products to powering the manufacturing centers that create computers, smart phones, healthcare technologies, vehicles, and batteries.

By |2017-12-15T11:28:28-04:00December 10th, 2017|CFACT Insights|1 Comment